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Corporate Cultures Crazy Impact on the World

A colleague in the Global Network of Cultural Transformation Consultants, Carol Ring, wrote this newsletter on the Impact of Corporate Culture. I thought it was brilliant and with her permission, I am sharing it with you

 

Make no mistake: the Olympic Games are big business, occurring every two years and ranging in budget from $1 billion to $51 billion. But despite the reports of cost and budget overruns that lead up to each game, at the end of the day, the Olympics draw almost 4 billion viewers worldwide. That’s more than double the number of users on Facebook!

 

What is it about the values of the Olympic Games that transcends business to bring people together in such a meaningful way? Why is it that the image we remember most is that of more than 200 National Athletic Associations standing peacefully under the symbol of the Olympic rings? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if outside of the Olympic Games this appearance of common ground was real?

 

A global partnership

In 2000 the members of the United Nations adopted an ambitious framework of 8 global goals. These goals range from halving extreme poverty rates, to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education. And while many governments and not-for-profits have been involved in the work, so have many for-profit businesses.

 

When economies thrive so do the communities around them. How is your business supporting the bigger picture of global success? Are you lifting local communities out of poverty? Are you emphasizing the importance of global health care with your corporate social responsibility efforts?

 

How values drive global development

If solving the issues of the world were as easy as bringing athletes together, or making global declarations we would have solved world peace many years ago. The World Values Survey (WVS) has been doing some interesting work to better understand how the values of a nation are driving global development. The WVS has over the years demonstrated that people’s beliefs play a key role in economic development, the emergence and flourishing of democratic institutions, the rise of gender equality, and the extent to which societies have effective government. Through their survey they have been able to map the values of over 80 countries. You can check out where your country falls here.

 

As the values of a nation evolve the political will for change grows. Australia is an example of a country that has taken up the challenge to define the kind of country they want to be. They call their initiative The Big Conversation. Over 2,000 Australians were engaged in a National Values Assessment. The survey highlighted that the country suffered from bureaucracy, blame and wasted resources. By focusing on reducing the costs and unproductive energy associated with these limiting values Australia hopes to put itself in a position of global competitiveness. This work has not been dumped on the government alone; the initiative is a call to all sectors to embrace the people’s desire to move away from these constraining attributes.

 

An Outward Ripple by Business

Each and every one of us has the ability to influence our national cultures because ultimately, individuals create national cultures. To improve our national cultures, we must improve our own corporate cultures as well as be active guardians of governmental actions and policies that have an impact on those cultures.

 

In the same manner, each of us has the ability to influence the cultures of other nations. In 1998, as a result of his first-grade project, young Ryan Hreljac decided to raise $70 to pay for a water well in Africa. Three years later, at the ripe age of 10, he created Ryan’s Well Foundation, which to date has helped build more than 1,090 water projects serving more than 864,768 Africans.

 

To change the world do we need to be a Ryan or lead a campaign on the scale of Australia’s Big Conversation? Absolutely not; these are heady challenges. However, we can align our values to make our world substantially better than it is today. If the athletes of hundreds of nations can stand together peacefully under the values of the Olympic Games, then better awareness and implementation of our personal values can certainly improve our communities and businesses and indeed influence entire nations.

 

I encourage you to think about where you will make changes in your corporate culture to help influence the values of your community. How can your business contribute to a shift toward a stronger national culture? You see, it’s not that crazy to think that our organizations’ culture can impact the world. Together we can be the ripple in the pond and effect great change.

 

Wishing you success.

Carol Ring

TheCultureConnection.com

www.carolring.ca

 

With love from Singapore

Joanna Barclay

 

Upcoming Events:
At the CTT International Conference 2016: Values-Driven Leadership in Business and Society
Where: Toronto, Canada, When: September 26-27

Be sure to visit our Free Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Signature Keynote- Bringing Happiness into the Workplace Culture.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with your workplace culture and what is impact performance, contact us for an Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Global Speaker, Published Author, Certified Professional Facilitator, and Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Evolution of the Chief Culture Officer

More and more companies today are making culture a business imperative by adding a new leadership position to the senior management team, the CCO – Chief Culture Officer. Their role, to keep an eye on the company’s culture and ensure leaders ‘walk the talk’and live the changes that are needed to achieve its new strategic initiatives.

Corporate culture drives everything an organization does – it’s successes and its failures. The way leaders behave, communicate and make decisions has led to big mistakes, especially when common sense and morality go out the window.

What makes leading change and building an engaged, healthy, and productive workplace culture a challenge? It’s the conscious effort it takes to make values and behaviours tangible and meaningful to all stakeholders in the company. More and more companies are trying to do this, and why tools such as Cultural Values Assessments are gaining in popularity.

The importance of culture at the CEO level has been increasing since the recession. Senior leaders are recognizing the impact global pressures are having on the bottom line, and their role in creating dysfunctional culture and a disengaged workforce. With employee engagement figures declining around the world, leaders are trying to keep their corporate culture from deteriorating even more.

One way to prevent this is to hire a senior leader into the C-Suite whose job it is to champion the corporate culture. The best-known example of this approach is Google, which added “chief culture officer” to head of HR, Stacy Sullivan’s job title in 2006. She argues that, “If you infuse fun into the work environment, you will have more engaged employees, greater job satisfaction, increased productivity and a brighter place to be.”

It makes sense that Google would have a CCO, with their well-known culture of innovation and foosball at work. What about other industries? The financial industry have hired culture chiefs as well. One example is North Jersey Community Bank (NJCB), which recently appointed Maria Gendelman as its chief culture officer. CEO Frank Sorrentino encountered resistance from his board when he argued for the position, because the job description was tough to define. As a result of the new position, having a chief culture officer is a differentiator for the bank. Gendelman says. “Could every bank utilize a protector of the culture as part of the team?” she asks. “Absolutely.”

Most companies hire someone at the top to monitor culture if they’re expecting dramatic change, like a merger and acquisition. However, culture happens over time and needs to be managed on an on-going basis, because change in behaviour happens gradually.

An effective Chief Culture Officer needs to have the full support of top management with the CEO’s ear, and not grow too distant from the rank-and-file employees that live, breathe, and define a company’s culture with everything they do.

Are you investing in your culture, or do you have an unconscious default culture? Not many CEO’s would proudly stand up and declare they have an unconscious default culture. Why then is there such resistance to mapping, measuring and managing it, just like any other corporate resource? Because the soft stuff is the hard stuff. Senior management is more comfortable working with tangible plans, and balance sheets.

It takes a courageous leader to venture into the land of values, mindsets and behaviours, to build a people-centric organization that brings values, meaning and purpose into the workplace. Those who do, and hire a Chief Culture Office, discover the operational value of being aligned with their workforce. When the culture (how people behave and what they believe in) is in alignment with the business strategies, vision and mission, success follows. If it is out of alignment, staff will become disengaged, and it becomes very difficult to achieve new strategic initiatives.

No culture is all good or all bad, however, appointing a Chief Culture Officer is one way to keep an eye on the challenges a company faces when changing behaviour is a business imperative. What is great to see is companies are thinking about culture in a whole new light.

 

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our Elearning Seminar –  Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

Stuck in the MUD?! Learning Goals to Develop Authentic Leadership Skills

Stuck in the MUD?! Learning Goals Develop Authentic Leadership Skills

The way we grow as leaders is to set new goals to develop authentic leadership skills. Doing new things that take us out of our comfort zone and teach us something new about who we want to become.
The nice thing about setting learning goals is we can let go of the need to be perfect from the start. They allow us to explore and discover new things about ourselves.
It’s often the small things that make the most difference: openness to new ideas, the way you communicate, or interact with others. Each time you set new goals for yourself is an opportunity to learn and grow.
Sharing our personal stories about where we are or how we have become successful, develops authentic leadership skills. It connects shared experiences on an emotional level that is powerful for building trust relationships.
– Have your stories become outdated?
– How do they reflect who you are and the learning goals you have for yourself and the organization?
The stories we share as leaders need to reflect who we are and who we want to become. To be an effective, authentic leader, our learning goals need to resonate with our personal values and the values of our audience we are trying to inspire and motivate.
Einstein’s definition for insanity is: “continuing to do the same thing while expecting different results”.
My definition of cultural insanity is: “maintaining the same leadership style, communication and decision making while expecting higher levels of employee engagement and productivity”.

We would love to hear your thoughts on learning goals to develop your leadership skills.

Explore your learning goals with our Leadership Development Report – or our free Personal Values Assessment.

 

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our Elearning Seminar – Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.