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Corporate Cultures Crazy Impact on the World

A colleague in the Global Network of Cultural Transformation Consultants, Carol Ring, wrote this newsletter on the Impact of Corporate Culture. I thought it was brilliant and with her permission, I am sharing it with you

 

Make no mistake: the Olympic Games are big business, occurring every two years and ranging in budget from $1 billion to $51 billion. But despite the reports of cost and budget overruns that lead up to each game, at the end of the day, the Olympics draw almost 4 billion viewers worldwide. That’s more than double the number of users on Facebook!

 

What is it about the values of the Olympic Games that transcends business to bring people together in such a meaningful way? Why is it that the image we remember most is that of more than 200 National Athletic Associations standing peacefully under the symbol of the Olympic rings? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if outside of the Olympic Games this appearance of common ground was real?

 

A global partnership

In 2000 the members of the United Nations adopted an ambitious framework of 8 global goals. These goals range from halving extreme poverty rates, to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education. And while many governments and not-for-profits have been involved in the work, so have many for-profit businesses.

 

When economies thrive so do the communities around them. How is your business supporting the bigger picture of global success? Are you lifting local communities out of poverty? Are you emphasizing the importance of global health care with your corporate social responsibility efforts?

 

How values drive global development

If solving the issues of the world were as easy as bringing athletes together, or making global declarations we would have solved world peace many years ago. The World Values Survey (WVS) has been doing some interesting work to better understand how the values of a nation are driving global development. The WVS has over the years demonstrated that people’s beliefs play a key role in economic development, the emergence and flourishing of democratic institutions, the rise of gender equality, and the extent to which societies have effective government. Through their survey they have been able to map the values of over 80 countries. You can check out where your country falls here.

 

As the values of a nation evolve the political will for change grows. Australia is an example of a country that has taken up the challenge to define the kind of country they want to be. They call their initiative The Big Conversation. Over 2,000 Australians were engaged in a National Values Assessment. The survey highlighted that the country suffered from bureaucracy, blame and wasted resources. By focusing on reducing the costs and unproductive energy associated with these limiting values Australia hopes to put itself in a position of global competitiveness. This work has not been dumped on the government alone; the initiative is a call to all sectors to embrace the people’s desire to move away from these constraining attributes.

 

An Outward Ripple by Business

Each and every one of us has the ability to influence our national cultures because ultimately, individuals create national cultures. To improve our national cultures, we must improve our own corporate cultures as well as be active guardians of governmental actions and policies that have an impact on those cultures.

 

In the same manner, each of us has the ability to influence the cultures of other nations. In 1998, as a result of his first-grade project, young Ryan Hreljac decided to raise $70 to pay for a water well in Africa. Three years later, at the ripe age of 10, he created Ryan’s Well Foundation, which to date has helped build more than 1,090 water projects serving more than 864,768 Africans.

 

To change the world do we need to be a Ryan or lead a campaign on the scale of Australia’s Big Conversation? Absolutely not; these are heady challenges. However, we can align our values to make our world substantially better than it is today. If the athletes of hundreds of nations can stand together peacefully under the values of the Olympic Games, then better awareness and implementation of our personal values can certainly improve our communities and businesses and indeed influence entire nations.

 

I encourage you to think about where you will make changes in your corporate culture to help influence the values of your community. How can your business contribute to a shift toward a stronger national culture? You see, it’s not that crazy to think that our organizations’ culture can impact the world. Together we can be the ripple in the pond and effect great change.

 

Wishing you success.

Carol Ring

TheCultureConnection.com

www.carolring.ca

 

With love from Singapore

Joanna Barclay

 

Upcoming Events:
At the CTT International Conference 2016: Values-Driven Leadership in Business and Society
Where: Toronto, Canada, When: September 26-27

Be sure to visit our Free Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Signature Keynote- Bringing Happiness into the Workplace Culture.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with your workplace culture and what is impact performance, contact us for an Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Global Speaker, Published Author, Certified Professional Facilitator, and Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Fear Courage Buttons Show Scary Or Unafraid

What Hinders Innovation? A Leadership Culture of Fear

At the conclusion of my webinar Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast I ask the question: “What would you do if you knew you could not fail?”

How many of us limit our potential and thus reduce our level of employee engagement because we fear repercussions from our behavior or judgement by our peers?

In many workplace cultures, a culture of fear governs people’s behavior. We fear not having enough which can lead to control and greed. We fear not being appreciated, loved or respected enough which can leads manipulation, and blame. We fear not being good enough which can lead to bureaucracy, information hoarding, and silo mentality.
When it comes to innovation and creativity, how many of us will not put forward an idea out of fear of not being right, or we wait for that one piece of data that will ensure it’s acceptable. And eventually the idea loses its timeliness and the opportunity for collaborative inspiration passes.

An excerpt from the book Conscious Culture , by Joanna Barclay
A few years ago, Shell CEO Peter Voser laid out a bold vision for Shell to become the most innovative energy company. Inspired by this call to action, chemical engineer Mandar Apte, part of Shell’s Game Changer program, designed the Empower initiative – an educational, staff-led curriculum that uses meditation exercises sourced from the International Association for Human Values to build individual capacity and enable creativity and innovation.
Apte: “Innovation starts with an idea, a hunch, a gut feeling. You don’t really know whether it’s going to be successful or if it’s going to fail unless you try it. You keep doing small things one at a time and you have small wins. Even failures tell you something, so you go back and you analyze. Innovation is a process.”

And with Empower, staff are provided with tools to develop greater emotional intelligence and inner resilience to improve focus and overcome failure.

Apte: “One has to learn how to drop the old habits, the old ideas, the old concepts, and taking a pause from the business of today, create a gap in your mind from the train of thoughts. That’s what meditation allows you. It gives you tools and techniques to pause. The second step involves social processes and interpersonal skills. If you can invoke compassion or empathy in yourself, where you are not judging yourself, you’re not criticizing yourself, nor are you judging somebody else, then I think there is a space for insights to be created. These qualities are crucial for grooming your own innovative skills and nourishing the innovation culture in an organization.”

The challenge for leaders is how to measure the return on investment, and gauge the impact and success of programs like Empower. At Shell they decided to capture anecdotal evidence through stories of empowerment that changed the culture and people’s work habits.

Apte: “Some stories are about how people have been able to make unique connections. By nature they may not have chosen to interact with somebody else, but through the Empower techniques, they have built connections that are beyond their traditional skill pool. It’s through such connections that you can start thinking about non-traditional ideas. That is how you can leverage someone else and together, co-create something. It’s not an “I-win-and-you-lose” world. It’s a world where I need to think about how I can win and how I can make you win. The third kind of story we measure is when a group of staff have gone through the Empower program and then they organize a workshop for their peers… creating a culture of empowerment around them.”

What impact has Empower had on helping Shell employees become better leaders?

Apte: “I think everybody is a leader and everybody strives to do the best they can. The Empower program, because it is based on breathing and meditation techniques, is a tool-set that you walk away with and can practice every day. It’s like running a marathon. You have to do the meditation practices every day to build your capacity to overcome the blocks to your own innovation and creativity. Secondly, regular meditation practice helps develop positive habits that will support you and the company to be creative and more innovative. I think Empower has provided these self-development tools to staff and empowered them to play a role in the innovation culture”.

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our E-learning Seminar - Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

 

3 Steps to a Successful Strategy Implementation

Everyone knows workplace culture is important. In many cases, a company’s culture is more important than its strategy or operating model. A few years ago, a consulting company in Singapore did a study with 200 companies. Their results showed 9 out of 10 strategic initiatives failed because leaders didn’t focus on changing people’s behaviours and how they worked together.

Do you have new business requirements and strategies that will require different behaviours and a shift in corporate culture? Unless you focus on changing how people work together how can you expect different results? Einstein said that doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results is… insanity.

If Einstein was at your workplace, he might say “Leading, managing and behaving in the same old ways while expecting your employees to embrace new work habits and higher levels of collaboration is cultural insanity.”

In your annual planning sessions, do you see strategies coming back… year-after-year because your organization didn’t implement them successfully? One reason might be because your current culture, the way people are working today, is out of alignment with the strategies you’re trying to implement.
May I help you increase your strategy implementation success?

It’s as easy as 1…2…3…

Step 1

Identify all the stakeholders who are impacted by the strategies you wish to implement. A stakeholder is any person or group who has an interest in your success.

Step 2
Conduct an environmental scan with your key stakeholders and identify the drivers for change. They are the impetus and motivation for change, providing the change effort’s relevance and meaning. Drivers are the purpose for those leading the change as well as those who are going to be affected by the change. People need to understand and accept the compelling reasons for change before they will commit to changing their behaviours.

Worksheet – Compelling Reasons for Change
Purpose: To build commitment for cultural transformation by conducting an environmental scan and identifying the compelling reasons for change.

Stakeholder Analysis & Environment Scan

Stakeholder analysis:
Who are our stakeholders?
What do they need from us?
How do we serve them?
External business environment:
What changes are affecting our organization and generating new business imperatives?
Internal business environment
How do we constantly learn from our experiences and daily operations?
How do team members bring themselves fully to work?
Organizational and social structures:
How do we develop clarity on team objectives between all stakeholders?
How does the team best organize itself to deliver on priorities?
The forces that hold the team together:
What is the level of trust on the team? Using the Trust Matrix below, plot five areas of strength and five areas that need developing.
What would motivate team members to give more to this team versus other teams?

 

Trust Matrix

Step 3

The most challenging struggles identified in the drivers for change deal with leaders’ and team members’ behaviours and mindset. They need to develop awareness, ownership, and responsibility for the internal drivers of change such as personal behaviors and values. This is because organizations do not change: it is the people in them that do. For sustained success and real change to happen, the change must begin at the base, in the mindset and values of leaders and staff. When mindsets change, new thinking and strategies emerge, making new behaviors possible, sparking a rippling effect up the drivers of change.

Drivers of Change

 

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our E-learning Seminar - Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

 

The High Cost of Low Engagement

Increasing employee engagement and performance are top of mind issues for business leaders.

  1. Do you know the cost of low engagement on your bottom line?
  2. What would you do differently if you did?

Low Engagement Scenario:

  • There are 100 people in the organization with an average annual salary of $50,000 = 5,000,000
  • Employees are at some level demotivated, but still competent – 40% demotivated
    • (Gallup average disengagement level in North America is between 65-70%)
  • This means they are operating at a level of performance – 60%
  • Operating loss of = $5,000,000 x .40 = (2,000,000)

Note: This loss does not count the cost of lost customers/clients because of dealing with one of these employees.

Demotivated and disengaged people do not like to be alone. They recruit others in the lunch room, company picnic… where ever there are opportunities to play the game “isn’t it awful”. Therefore if you do nothing the number of disengaged employees and costs will increase even more.

Demotivated employees usual stay for a minimum of 6 months or more.

How long do you want them to stay?

Have you considered what it really means to be engaged?

The new business paradigm of the 21st century has put more attention on culture, how things are done, decisions are made, and the work environment. Times have changed and with these changes management styles and leadership must understand and respond to what employees are looking for.  There are three key elements that will increase engagement.

Employees want to:

  1. Understand what they are responsible for;
  2. Be committed to the goals;
  3. Excited about where the company is going and helping it get there.

Why do Employees Become Disengaged?

  1. “Lack of energy” – they are not well-matched for the job, want to make decisions and not being allowed to
  2. “Lack of endorsement” – they do not feel valued, supported or included in the organization by their superior (recognition)
  3. “Inability to adapt to change” – they do not understand what is expected of them. The change strategy does not include training to support development of new desired behaviours.

To Shift Engagement

What would it be worth to your organization if you could measure your level of de-motivation and create a true atmosphere of full engagement that meets your corporate initiatives for growth? Check out the RESOURCES tab and download Improving Your Business Through Values to learn more about mapping and measuring your culture.

Does this interest you?

In our scenario with 100 people and 40% level disengagement, you are CONSERVATIVELY spending a minimum of $2,000,000 a year on demotivated employees.

Let’s SHIFT the perspective to what can be done cost effectively. If you were able to move your employees and increase engagement by only 10%, you would gain $200,000 to your bottom line.

Is this doable for you?

The way forward is changing what you value and associated behaviours. Change behaviours and you change business results.

The gains:

  • New ways of working with staff
  • Pinpointing exactly what is needed
  • More business focus and results orientation
  • Creating a positive “want to” íattitude toward tasks

The changes:

  1. New leadership behaviours to change the culture
  2. New employee behaviours indicating shifts in culture
  3. Improved business results

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our E-learning Seminar - Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.