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Creating a Better World

At a recent talk, an attendee asked if I had noticed a shift in the consciousness of people around the world.  And the answer I gave was, yes. As democracy flourishes, millions of people are demanding their voices be heard, not just in how nations are governed, but also in how the organizations are led and run.

More than ever before people are looking for accountability, equality, fairness, freedom, openness, transparency, and trust.

Is this a good thing? I believe it is if you truly would like to see a better world.

Check out how world-class, freedom-centered (rather than fear-based) organizations and leaders are doing in over 80 countries around the world through Worldblu.com.

It all starts with building better organizations, who have a purpose to add value to society.  Did you know, the most successful organizations in the world are values-driven?  How is this you ask?  When you seek to understand employee’s needs, and make an effort to fulfil those needs, employees respond by becoming more engaged, and bring creativity and commitment into work.

How many times have I heard leaders asking for higher engagement, creativity and commitment?  Almost very organization is looking for these. They have become the new buzzwords.

So the next question I often get during my talks is: “How do I meet all of my employee needs?  They have so many it seems.  My response is quite simple:

We all have the same basic human needs, which everyone wants to experience in life and at work.

Respect, Integrity, Loyalty, Fairness, and Trust.

Who does not wish to experience these?  In fact, it’s when we don’t that trouble happens.

We all want to feel accepted for who we are, our values and behaviours. The challenge is we do not all have the same beliefs or expected behaviours that define these values.  Hence, the need for dialogue and accepting our differences.  This is a biggie, accepting our differences.

More often than not, we judge each other and expect others to be just like us.  However, if we can accept people for who they are, and make an effort to share our values, what makes them important to us, and the kind of behaviours we’d like to experience, an amazing transformation can happen.

When people talk about their values, they connect on the heart level. It creates a deep connection, sense of belongingness and trust. Give it a try by taking your own Personal Values Assessment and share the results with your family, friends and team. Here is a teambuilding exercise to use in working with your values.

Another challenge to creating a better world is our personal values as a society are not currently in alignment with business values. For example, we want to trust our leaders, and have them care about the health and welfare of others, make a difference and contribute to society as a whole. Can business as a whole say it shares the same values? If we look at our current political reality, there are global leaders who are governed by self-interest and not looking out for the common good.

It is misalignment of values like this that is causing the decrease in employee engagement leading to reduced productivity and efficiency. Business needs to find ways to create inspiring visions, with meaning and purpose that align with the values of their employees, strategic objectives, and society.

The greatest cultural transformation happens when leadership teams are asked to put aside the personal agendas and the self-interest of the organizations they represent, to work together as one for the common good.  In doing so they all reap the exponential benefits. Before transformation, valuable resources were spent dealing with confrontations. With a common vision and shared values, members can make more efficient use of their resources by collaborating and maximizing their strengths.

Conscious awakening is happening in the world. It is no longer acceptable for businesses to avoid responsibility for all its stakeholders, even when they live on the opposite side of the planet. Thanks to social media and globalization, Third World countries will see benefit in the long term as we learn to take care of each other for the common good. It may take a pinch of enlightened self-interest and, sometimes, tragedy for change to happen; however, evolutionary transformation cannot be stopped once conscious awareness has taken place.

Creating a better world happens through the ABCs of High Performance. Start with AWARENESS of employees’ needs through a Cultural Values Assessment. Create a sense of BELONGINGNESS  by building trust in sharing your values. And  COMMIT as an organization to an inspiring vision.

With love from Singapore.

Joanna

We are very excited to share that my book, Conscious Culture, has been selected by the Government of Canada to be included in their recommended reading list of Reference Material for Ethics Advisors/Officers. What an honour! https://cultureleadershipgroup.com/conscious-culture-book/

Be sure to visit our Free Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Signature Keynote – Awakening the Heart of Leadership Potential

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with your workplace culture and what is impact performance, contact us for an Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Global Speaker, Published Author, Certified Professional Facilitator, and Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Planning a Merger or Leading Change? Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast

There is a well-known saying by Peter Drucker: “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” Applied to culture change this means whatever new strategies a leadership team creates will not succeed unless they are aligned with the current or desired culture.  How can you expect different results unless you focus consciously on changing the way people behave and interact with each other?

What sunk the Titanic was not above the waterline but below. The currents of emotions within an organization are at play beneath the surface. The saying, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast,” is an apt description of the power of cultural currents and their impact on strategic initiatives. How people do things, the management style, and the way decisions are made all play out here.

Beneath the surface is where habits and traditions exist that either engage and empower people or hold them back from wanting to adapt to change. Here is where attitudes and beliefs create resistance, and where values and behaviors are expressed and lived.

Planning a merger? Imagine the impact a Cultural Values Assessment can have on leading the integration of two organizations successfully.  What do you need to think about?

Leadership is recognizing how important engaged employees, collaboration, and the power of collective action are to achieving business results. The ability to implement new strategies depends on creating a shared vision and moving in a common direction.  Leaders need to believe and commit to the new strategies, and create internal cohesion on the leadership team.

What can prevent this from happening?  Resistance to change.  The “why” is not compelling enough, emotional fears block new behaviours due to uncertainty of the future, or not trusting the leader to keep their promises. Resistance to change is one of the biggest obstacles to leading successful change.

The most critical successful factor is the leadership team and their commitment to cultural transformation. There needs to be a shift in thinking and behavior from “me” to “we”. The “we” is the ability to create shared goals with shared values. Building trust and having a common approach to achieving the goals, and working together.

Imagine what this will mean to leaders who only know a command and control style of leadership. “My way or the highway!” It will require the development of a new leadership style—one that is more facilitative with a focus on building consensus and engaging participation. This can be a huge change in what leaders’ value, the way they behave, and how performance is measured.

The way of reaching your goals and realizing your strategies is embedded in how people act and interact with one another.  In other words, your culture. We all know Einstein’s theory of insanity:

“Doing the same things over and over again and expecting different results.”

Well here’s mine for cultural insanity:

“Expecting your employees to embrace new work habits and higher levels of collaboration between teams, while maintaining the same management style, organizational values, and behaviors.”

In the current global climate where increasing awareness and knowledge management is a competitive advantage, it would stand to reason that creating a conscious culture would be a management priority. This begs the question: “Are you investing in your culture or will you continue to have an unconscious, default culture?”

There are several reasons to invest in creating a conscious culture:

  • To become an employer of choice, and build a high performing workplace.
  • To increase employee engagement and retention.
  • To build a new culture after a merger or acquisition.

One way to create a conscious culture is to map and measure it by conducting a Cultural Values Assessment with the organization. I love this process because it includes everyone in the process of change which builds awareness, belongingness and commitment to cultural transformation. Whatever changes are required to align the culture with the new strategies will emerge in the process of reviewing the results with staff and the leaders.

A values assessment empowers leaders to map, measure and manage their cultural transformation for strategic success.

With love from Singapore.

Joanna

We are very excited to share that my book, Conscious Culture, has been selected by the Government of Canada to be included in their recommended reading list of Reference Material for Ethics Advisors/Officers. What an honour! https://cultureleadershipgroup.com/conscious-culture-book/

Be sure to visit our Free Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Signature Keynote – Awakening the Heart of Leadership Potential

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with your workplace culture and what is impact performance, contact us for an Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Global Speaker, Published Author, Certified Professional Facilitator, and Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Corporate Cultures Crazy Impact on the World

A colleague in the Global Network of Cultural Transformation Consultants, Carol Ring, wrote this newsletter on the Impact of Corporate Culture. I thought it was brilliant and with her permission, I am sharing it with you

 

Make no mistake: the Olympic Games are big business, occurring every two years and ranging in budget from $1 billion to $51 billion. But despite the reports of cost and budget overruns that lead up to each game, at the end of the day, the Olympics draw almost 4 billion viewers worldwide. That’s more than double the number of users on Facebook!

 

What is it about the values of the Olympic Games that transcends business to bring people together in such a meaningful way? Why is it that the image we remember most is that of more than 200 National Athletic Associations standing peacefully under the symbol of the Olympic rings? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if outside of the Olympic Games this appearance of common ground was real?

 

A global partnership

In 2000 the members of the United Nations adopted an ambitious framework of 8 global goals. These goals range from halving extreme poverty rates, to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education. And while many governments and not-for-profits have been involved in the work, so have many for-profit businesses.

 

When economies thrive so do the communities around them. How is your business supporting the bigger picture of global success? Are you lifting local communities out of poverty? Are you emphasizing the importance of global health care with your corporate social responsibility efforts?

 

How values drive global development

If solving the issues of the world were as easy as bringing athletes together, or making global declarations we would have solved world peace many years ago. The World Values Survey (WVS) has been doing some interesting work to better understand how the values of a nation are driving global development. The WVS has over the years demonstrated that people’s beliefs play a key role in economic development, the emergence and flourishing of democratic institutions, the rise of gender equality, and the extent to which societies have effective government. Through their survey they have been able to map the values of over 80 countries. You can check out where your country falls here.

 

As the values of a nation evolve the political will for change grows. Australia is an example of a country that has taken up the challenge to define the kind of country they want to be. They call their initiative The Big Conversation. Over 2,000 Australians were engaged in a National Values Assessment. The survey highlighted that the country suffered from bureaucracy, blame and wasted resources. By focusing on reducing the costs and unproductive energy associated with these limiting values Australia hopes to put itself in a position of global competitiveness. This work has not been dumped on the government alone; the initiative is a call to all sectors to embrace the people’s desire to move away from these constraining attributes.

 

An Outward Ripple by Business

Each and every one of us has the ability to influence our national cultures because ultimately, individuals create national cultures. To improve our national cultures, we must improve our own corporate cultures as well as be active guardians of governmental actions and policies that have an impact on those cultures.

 

In the same manner, each of us has the ability to influence the cultures of other nations. In 1998, as a result of his first-grade project, young Ryan Hreljac decided to raise $70 to pay for a water well in Africa. Three years later, at the ripe age of 10, he created Ryan’s Well Foundation, which to date has helped build more than 1,090 water projects serving more than 864,768 Africans.

 

To change the world do we need to be a Ryan or lead a campaign on the scale of Australia’s Big Conversation? Absolutely not; these are heady challenges. However, we can align our values to make our world substantially better than it is today. If the athletes of hundreds of nations can stand together peacefully under the values of the Olympic Games, then better awareness and implementation of our personal values can certainly improve our communities and businesses and indeed influence entire nations.

 

I encourage you to think about where you will make changes in your corporate culture to help influence the values of your community. How can your business contribute to a shift toward a stronger national culture? You see, it’s not that crazy to think that our organizations’ culture can impact the world. Together we can be the ripple in the pond and effect great change.

 

Wishing you success.

Carol Ring

TheCultureConnection.com

www.carolring.ca

 

With love from Singapore

Joanna Barclay

 

Upcoming Events:
At the CTT International Conference 2016: Values-Driven Leadership in Business and Society
Where: Toronto, Canada, When: September 26-27

Be sure to visit our Free Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Signature Keynote- Bringing Happiness into the Workplace Culture.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with your workplace culture and what is impact performance, contact us for an Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Global Speaker, Published Author, Certified Professional Facilitator, and Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Conscious Culture vs Unconscious Default Culture

November 11, 2015 1st Anniversary of our book launch in Southeast Asia.
Between conscious and unconscious culture of old and new values and behaviors, of unconscious victimization and conscious choice, is a cultural transition of major proportions. Many organizations are undecided about which way to go and are some type of combination of both worlds. They are unsure and fear the unknown. Fear keeps people connected to traditions, tied to values that defined and created the past. It takes courage to learn and grow, to face the fears of conscious incompetence to become consciously competent.
An important question to ask yourself as a leader: Do you have conscious culture or do you have an unconscious default culture? Are you aware of what is driving your culture and creating your brand in the market place, attracting the top talent, maximizing profit and your human potential?

Culture and Brand

An unconscious default culture is typically the result of old-style leadership, bureaucracy, and hierarchy. It can be seen in the following values and behaviors:
Good employees keep their heads down and do what they are asked to do without complaint.
Good employees know how to make the boss look good.
People who raise uncomfortable questions are troublemakers.
People who rock the boat will pay for it; if not now, later.
Loyalty to the boss/organization means covering up problems, truths, and even ethical issues that could make us look bad.
Achieving individual agendas is the whole game. There are winners and losers and Im no loser. Blaming, judging, undermining others, scapegoating and other forms of cover your ass behavior are the norm. These behaviors involve individuals, whole teams, and entire departments.
These fear-based values and behaviors will not be present at all times; however, they are dysfunctional and have the effect of decreasing employee engagement, productivity, and performance. To fully drive fear out of the workplace, It is essential for all stakeholders to be actively involved in rejecting these limiting values and behaviors.’
Actively rejecting means action and personally behaving in ways that contradict these negative background beliefs.
Organizations with high levels of entropy have messengers who get shot and leaders who don’t listen. Both are stereotypes reflecting our fears of one another and our need for self-protection. The courage to speak up and the courage to listen are ways to manifest change. It requires courage to stay in the tension of the moment, the anxiety, and particularly the fear that our sincere engagement with others might cause damage, distress, and repercussions – or that we will simply experience humiliation and anger because nothing will be done about the organizational problems we chose to bring forward. If we have two enemies in this world, it is precisely the fear of repercussions and the belief that nothing will change.
Unconscious default culture lacks the courage to stand up and consciously choose to create a different kind of workplace, one where people seek and express understanding rather than make disconnected and insensitive speeches, or hide behind one another’s backs. Creating conscious culture happens only if leaders refuse to let fear guide their steps because fear is the essence of the old ways of behaving. Conscious culture happens only if we choose to address what is right in front of us.
This all works best when it is done in the name of being of service to the greater good, to one another and to our customers being the best for the world, not just in the world.
We have all experienced and lived limiting values and behaviors. We have all contributed to negativity at one time or another, when things have gone wrong or there have been tough challenges. Here are some of the ways we can create a conscious culture together. To quote Mahatma Gandhi: You must be the change you wish to see in the world….
It is essential to understand that rejecting a default culture is not the same as rejecting people.

Default versus Conscious Culture

To create a healthy conscious culture we need to become consciously competent and aware of the source and impact of the limiting behaviors and values. Only then can we begin to take ownership and responsibility for change. The learning begins with unconscious incompetence, totally unaware there is a problem. Once we are informed of the problem we move to conscious incompetence: knowing there is a problem, but not how to solve it. With dialogue and continuous learning in action learning focus groups we develop conscious competence. Once the new behaviors become ingrained we become unconsciously competent, where the behaviors are natural and automatic.

Conscious Competency Model

Figure 12-2 : Conscious Competence Model

 

Be sure to visit our Free-Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Elearning Seminar – Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

Evolution of the Chief Culture Officer

More and more companies today are making culture a business imperative by adding a new leadership position to the senior management team, the CCO – Chief Culture Officer. Their role, to keep an eye on the company’s culture and ensure leaders ‘walk the talk’and live the changes that are needed to achieve its new strategic initiatives.

Corporate culture drives everything an organization does – it’s successes and its failures. The way leaders behave, communicate and make decisions has led to big mistakes, especially when common sense and morality go out the window.

What makes leading change and building an engaged, healthy, and productive workplace culture a challenge? It’s the conscious effort it takes to make values and behaviours tangible and meaningful to all stakeholders in the company. More and more companies are trying to do this, and why tools such as Cultural Values Assessments are gaining in popularity.

The importance of culture at the CEO level has been increasing since the recession. Senior leaders are recognizing the impact global pressures are having on the bottom line, and their role in creating dysfunctional culture and a disengaged workforce. With employee engagement figures declining around the world, leaders are trying to keep their corporate culture from deteriorating even more.

One way to prevent this is to hire a senior leader into the C-Suite whose job it is to champion the corporate culture. The best-known example of this approach is Google, which added “chief culture officer” to head of HR, Stacy Sullivan’s job title in 2006. She argues that, “If you infuse fun into the work environment, you will have more engaged employees, greater job satisfaction, increased productivity and a brighter place to be.”

It makes sense that Google would have a CCO, with their well-known culture of innovation and foosball at work. What about other industries? The financial industry have hired culture chiefs as well. One example is North Jersey Community Bank (NJCB), which recently appointed Maria Gendelman as its chief culture officer. CEO Frank Sorrentino encountered resistance from his board when he argued for the position, because the job description was tough to define. As a result of the new position, having a chief culture officer is a differentiator for the bank. Gendelman says. “Could every bank utilize a protector of the culture as part of the team?” she asks. “Absolutely.”

Most companies hire someone at the top to monitor culture if they’re expecting dramatic change, like a merger and acquisition. However, culture happens over time and needs to be managed on an on-going basis, because change in behaviour happens gradually.

An effective Chief Culture Officer needs to have the full support of top management with the CEO’s ear, and not grow too distant from the rank-and-file employees that live, breathe, and define a company’s culture with everything they do.

Are you investing in your culture, or do you have an unconscious default culture? Not many CEO’s would proudly stand up and declare they have an unconscious default culture. Why then is there such resistance to mapping, measuring and managing it, just like any other corporate resource? Because the soft stuff is the hard stuff. Senior management is more comfortable working with tangible plans, and balance sheets.

It takes a courageous leader to venture into the land of values, mindsets and behaviours, to build a people-centric organization that brings values, meaning and purpose into the workplace. Those who do, and hire a Chief Culture Office, discover the operational value of being aligned with their workforce. When the culture (how people behave and what they believe in) is in alignment with the business strategies, vision and mission, success follows. If it is out of alignment, staff will become disengaged, and it becomes very difficult to achieve new strategic initiatives.

No culture is all good or all bad, however, appointing a Chief Culture Officer is one way to keep an eye on the challenges a company faces when changing behaviour is a business imperative. What is great to see is companies are thinking about culture in a whole new light.

 

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our Elearning Seminar –  Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

Creating Cultural Capital- The New Business Paradigm of the 21st Century

Here are some key facts about leadership and stakeholder value:

  • Leadership development drives cultural capital
  • Cultural capital drives employee fulfilment
  • Employee fulfilment drives client satisfaction
  • Client satisfaction drives stakeholder value

We are moving from the information age, where knowledge capital was our key concern, to the Age of Consciousness, where cultural capital is driving transformation.

Developing cultural capital in the Age of Consciousness means making an investment in how people work together and the “personality” or brand of the company. Financial capital is dependent on cultural capital, which is dependent on human capital. Values drive cultural capital and inspire human capital. This means it is necessary to measure and manage the values of an organization and its leaders to ensure the health, performance, and capacity to remain competitive.

For companies to achieve sustainable excellence they must be healthy. This means they must manage both their performance and health. In a 2010 survey, companies undergoing transformation revealed that organizations focused on performance and health simultaneously were nearly twice as successful as those who focus on health alone, and nearly three times as successful as those who focus on performance alone.

The center of attention the last four decades on business renewal has been on performance improvement. Now, with the emergence of consciousness, leaders recognize they need to spend more time on improving the culture and the health of the organization because this is where the need is.

Financial capital is easier to measure and manage as a corporate resource than cultural capital. This is because organizations have spent the last century developing accounting systems to track finances. Cultural capital is more challenging because values and behaviors are intangible. However intangible it may be, it is still a very important corporate resource that needs measurement and management. What you measure you can manage and improve. Much like the organization’s finances which are measured weekly and monthly, so too do the organization’s culture, values, and behaviors need to be monitored regularly by managers and leaders.

Worksheet – Creating Cultural Capital
Purpose: To raise awareness for the value of the cultural capital and how it is created

creating capital worksheet

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our Elearning Seminar – Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.