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IQ + EQ = SQ (Social Intelligence)

IQ + EQ = SQ 

Social Intelligence to Engage the Collaborative Organization

Learning to share power is the challenge of the 21st century.  For 17 years I’ve been a professional facilitator, helping teams and communities come together to build consensus and collaborate. What I’ve witnessed is people in all fields; technical, business, politics, and the caring industry, have trouble getting along and collaborating with their peers.

For thousands of years, hierarchical, command and control leaders have been the role model. Hence, it will take time for old patterns to change. Obstacles to success will arise daily as co-workers lack the skills, self-awareness, and interpersonal skills to collaborate. How to address conflict seems to be the biggest stumbling block, where those with EQ are far more successful than those with high levels of IQ.

In the technical fields, it’s not unusual to find conflict with people who suffer from a lack of social skills and have trouble getting along.  The level of trust for co-workers is very low, and collaboration is almost non-existent.  Conflict is also high when it comes to the business and political arenas, where people are expected to challenge the status quo, compete, and create something new.

I’d like to propose that success in the 21st century will actually depend more on SQ, social intelligence, the result of combining EQ and IQ.

Soft skills are changing the game:

  • IQ gets you in the door,
  • EQ get you recognized by your co-workers,
  • SQ, the science of human relationships, enables leaders to engage the collective wisdom of the organization.

To be a great socially intelligent leader, you need to know:

  • How to inspire and develop the talents of your people,
  • Create a safe environment which empowers staff to take creative risks,
  • Build relationships out in the community,
  • Make presentations,
  • Create inspiring visions,
  • Constantly stretch, learn, and grow, modelling how to expand and reinvent yourself.

The Organization Journey Map (Figure A-4) is a useful tool for seeing where the organization is currently and where it wishes to grow. The leadership and skills segments of the map are particularly helpful in understanding what new training and development is necessary to develop the skills needed to lead cultural change and transform into the collaborative organization. As the saying goes, “leaders need to be the change they wish to see.” This implies leaders need to have the competencies for managers and employees to follow.

Interaction is the core characteristic of the collaborative phase. Organizations in this phase aim for real teamwork between all members and departments. Their mission and goal is to make a quality impact on society. Socially intelligent leaders are enthusiastic, visionary, and empathetic. Their management style is facilitative. Key skills at this level are delegating responsibility, managing group conflict, growing from experience, and helping others do the same. The main difference between collaborative and lower-phase organizations is the free flow of ideas.

There is a reason why companies value team players.  Those who get along with others tend to rise to the top. Leaders can’t build organizations on brilliance alone and need people who can implement great ideas.  Collaboration trumps competition as a transformational force. Working together by harnessing the power our social intelligence through relationship, responsiveness and cooperation.

With love from Singapore.

Joanna

We are very excited to share that my book, Conscious Culture, has been selected by the Government of Canada to be included in their recommended reading list of Reference Material for Ethics Advisors/Officers. What an honour! https://cultureleadershipgroup.com/conscious-culture-book/

Be sure to visit our Free Resource Center to get access to free e-books, worksheets and other valuable leadership development resources.

Our Signature Keynote – Awakening the Heart of Leadership Potential

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with your workplace culture and what is impact performance, contact us for an Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Global Speaker, Published Author, Certified Professional Facilitator, and Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Evolution of the Chief Culture Officer

More and more companies today are making culture a business imperative by adding a new leadership position to the senior management team, the CCO – Chief Culture Officer. Their role, to keep an eye on the company’s culture and ensure leaders ‘walk the talk’and live the changes that are needed to achieve its new strategic initiatives.

Corporate culture drives everything an organization does – it’s successes and its failures. The way leaders behave, communicate and make decisions has led to big mistakes, especially when common sense and morality go out the window.

What makes leading change and building an engaged, healthy, and productive workplace culture a challenge? It’s the conscious effort it takes to make values and behaviours tangible and meaningful to all stakeholders in the company. More and more companies are trying to do this, and why tools such as Cultural Values Assessments are gaining in popularity.

The importance of culture at the CEO level has been increasing since the recession. Senior leaders are recognizing the impact global pressures are having on the bottom line, and their role in creating dysfunctional culture and a disengaged workforce. With employee engagement figures declining around the world, leaders are trying to keep their corporate culture from deteriorating even more.

One way to prevent this is to hire a senior leader into the C-Suite whose job it is to champion the corporate culture. The best-known example of this approach is Google, which added “chief culture officer” to head of HR, Stacy Sullivan’s job title in 2006. She argues that, “If you infuse fun into the work environment, you will have more engaged employees, greater job satisfaction, increased productivity and a brighter place to be.”

It makes sense that Google would have a CCO, with their well-known culture of innovation and foosball at work. What about other industries? The financial industry have hired culture chiefs as well. One example is North Jersey Community Bank (NJCB), which recently appointed Maria Gendelman as its chief culture officer. CEO Frank Sorrentino encountered resistance from his board when he argued for the position, because the job description was tough to define. As a result of the new position, having a chief culture officer is a differentiator for the bank. Gendelman says. “Could every bank utilize a protector of the culture as part of the team?” she asks. “Absolutely.”

Most companies hire someone at the top to monitor culture if they’re expecting dramatic change, like a merger and acquisition. However, culture happens over time and needs to be managed on an on-going basis, because change in behaviour happens gradually.

An effective Chief Culture Officer needs to have the full support of top management with the CEO’s ear, and not grow too distant from the rank-and-file employees that live, breathe, and define a company’s culture with everything they do.

Are you investing in your culture, or do you have an unconscious default culture? Not many CEO’s would proudly stand up and declare they have an unconscious default culture. Why then is there such resistance to mapping, measuring and managing it, just like any other corporate resource? Because the soft stuff is the hard stuff. Senior management is more comfortable working with tangible plans, and balance sheets.

It takes a courageous leader to venture into the land of values, mindsets and behaviours, to build a people-centric organization that brings values, meaning and purpose into the workplace. Those who do, and hire a Chief Culture Office, discover the operational value of being aligned with their workforce. When the culture (how people behave and what they believe in) is in alignment with the business strategies, vision and mission, success follows. If it is out of alignment, staff will become disengaged, and it becomes very difficult to achieve new strategic initiatives.

No culture is all good or all bad, however, appointing a Chief Culture Officer is one way to keep an eye on the challenges a company faces when changing behaviour is a business imperative. What is great to see is companies are thinking about culture in a whole new light.

 

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our Elearning Seminar –  Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

Transformational Leadership Inspires Employee Engagement

What are the new millennials looking for? Transformational Leadership that inspires employee engagement so they can realize their full potential without the use of power or authority.
How would you like to come into work everyday feeling excited and happy to be there? Imagine the perspective and energy you would have.

This a kind of ‘WOW’ workplace culture that is worth creating. The financial benefits and opportunities it can create, having your employees fully engaged and wanting to make a difference are enormous. Considering the average levels of employee engagement in North America are between 26 – 30% and in South East Asia, between 6-12%, that’s a lot of disengagement you’re paying for and not realizing the benefits.

Are you a boss or a leader?
What are the qualities in a great leader you admire?
How often do you think about living those qualities?

“All power and effectiveness comes from knowing the how and acting appropriately”, Tao of Leadership.

When you know how you are showing up and act with intention, paying attention to what is happening around you, you will have the ability to manifest your destiny. However, how often do we have an intention to act with respect, trust, or compassion? If we acted with respect, trust, or compassion in our heart and mind, what things would we be paying more attention to? What outcomes do you think we would achieve?

When respect shows, it grows.
When trust shows, it grows.
When love shows, it grows.
As a transformational leader, we have the power to manifest great things.
Intention + attention = manifestation!

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our Elearning Seminar – Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

Engaging and Empowering Employees with Facilitative Leadership

Leading discussions where participants are engaged in focused conversations, sharing perspectives, learning from each other, is a very effective form of continuous learning and facilitative leadership. When people are treated as equals and given accountability in the decision making process, they feel empowered to take ownership and responsibility for the solutions. Continuous learning, accountability, engagement, empowerment, and teamwork are the successful elements needed for successful transformation and high performance.

– Remember the last time you sat around with your colleagues, discussing a problem, there was energy in the room, camaraderie, everyone was participating, and contributing to solving the issue?
– Do you recall the sense of connectedness you felt, and level of commitment it generated?
– Didn’t it feel good being asked to collaborate, share your knowledge and experience, and make decisions that would make a difference?
– How successful was the implementation because you had shared goals and a way to achieve them?

Instead of facilitating by “the seat of your pants” and instinct, I would like to invite you to learn Group Facilitation Methods that teach leaders how to design and lead the most effective focused conversations. Some of my clients have even called the processes “Group Coaching”.

The power in the Group Facilitation Methods is learning how to ask the right questions at the right time. How does the human mind think? What role do our emotions play in decision making to ensure ownership and responsibility? How do you combine both the intellect and emotions to get the best results from a focused conversation? These questions and more are answered on the course.

Below are a few comments from Richard Saucier, Director, Treasury Board Secretariat, who attended the course in June 2013:

“I really enjoyed the course. It provided useful methods to interact with people, especially the meetings I need to chair. The structure of the group facilitation methods makes sure all the important aspects of a topic are covered, especially the emotional.”

The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking that created them” Albert Einstein

To lead change and transformation leaders need to create new consciousness (awareness) and sense of connectedness to build real commitment. Knowing how to design conversations that develop new thinking, and internal cohesion leads to greater success.

Group Facilitation Methods learning objectives:
– Access the wisdom of the group
– Improve horizontal communications
– Engage and empower participation
– Develop new awareness and connectedness
– Build commitment
– Strengthen harmonious teamwork

The course comes with the book “The Art of Focused Conversation” – 100 Ways to Access Group Wisdom in the Workplace.
Plus one hour of free coaching.

In-house courses are available upon request, with a maximum of 20 participants.
Contact Us for more information about how we can customize a program for you.

How would you like to become a leader that is known for empowering their people and achieving successful change?

 

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our E-learning Seminar – Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.

 

Fear of Empowerment

Fear of Empowerment

Yesterday I sent an email to my clients entitled – Engaging and Empowering Leadership, letting them know about a workshop to develop Facilitative Leadership skills – Group Facilitation Methods.

I received some valuable feedback I’d like to share with you that relates to empowerment.

The idea of empowerment and giving staff decision making power creates fear in leaders, especially in a culture where there is a high level of risk aversion. When the Canadian government introduced the Accountability Act several year ago, the impact this had was it created a work environment where there was a low tolerance for risk. This moved control for decision making to the top of organizations.

Taking away decision making power has several effects. It creates an environment of control which is potential limiting to people’s desire to lead and contribute, share ideas, be creative and innovative. When a leader imposes their will over others, it takes away the others’ will power and sense of responsibility.

In a high performing workplace culture, leaders want staff to take ownership and responsibility for identifying problems and solving them. How can a leader expect this behaviour if they have taken away the will power and ability to take ownership and responsibility for making decisions?

To create high performing cultures, leaders must live the values they wish to see. If they want people to take ownership and responsibility they need to let go of control. With a fear of empowerment there will be low employee engagement, low productivity, low morale and low performance.

To improve performance, employees need to be engaged and empowered to make decisions for the things they have control over. It takes conscious leadership to reflect and take ownership for the limiting values and behaviours being imposed on staff.

Organizational transformation begins with the personal transformation of the leaders. Organizations don’t transform, people do

So as a leader, open your door and invite staff to share their valuable ideas. Being a good listener is a powerful facilitative leadership competency. It make people feel appreciated and you learn a lot from them. We were given two ears and one mouth for a reason. Your people are the ones doing the work and have valuable experience and knowledge to share that can improve performance. When they are performing and contributing their full potential, the whole organization benefits.

Be sure to visit our Resource Center for valuable leadership development resources

Our E-learning Seminar – Building Your High Performing Workplace.

To find out what your personal values are that empower you to higher performance and productivity, take a Free Personal Values Assessment.

To learn how well aligned you are with the culture in your organization contact us for an – Individual Values Assessment

To learn how to map, measure and manage the culture of your team or organization with our Culture Value Assessment for Teams and Organizations.

Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Leadership Speaker Joanna Barclay (2)Contact Us Joanna BarclayJoanna Barclay, Speaker, Author, Leadership Consultant building high performing values-driven organizational culture.

With 30 years in business transformation working with organizations, Joanna’s passion lies in working with leaders, facilitating active participation in organizational change, developing resourceful teams and aligning strategic objectives. Her goal is to help organizations become high performing and values-driven, where people take ownership, build commitment and bridge communication gaps. As CEO of the Culture Leadership Group, she ensures successful transformation from concept through to implementation.